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PCR-based detection and partial genome sequencing indicate high genetic diversity in Bangladeshi begomoviruses and their whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci

PCR-based detection and partial genome sequencing indicate high genetic diversity in Bangladeshi begomoviruses and their whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci

Maruthi, M.N., Rekha, A.R., Mirza, S.H., Alam, S.N. and Colvin, John (2007) PCR-based detection and partial genome sequencing indicate high genetic diversity in Bangladeshi begomoviruses and their whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci. Virus Genes, 34 (3). pp. 373-385. ISSN 0920-8569 (doi:10.1007/s11262-006-0027-2)

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Abstract

The population diversity of Bangladeshi begomoviruses and their vector, Bemisia tabaci was analysed by PCR-based detection and partial genome sequencing. B. tabaci adults and plants expressing symptoms of virus infection were collected from locations representing diverse agro-ecological regions of the country. Universal and species-specific primers were used to detect begomoviruses in seven crops (chilli, okra, papaya, pumpkin, sponge gourd, tomato and yardlong bean) and two common weeds (Ageratum conyzoides and Croton bonplandianum). At least five distinct species of tomato leaf curl viruses infected tomato and other host-plants. Phylogenetic analyses of their nucleotide sequences (~530 bases) from the intergenic region and capsid protein of DNA-A indicated the existence of five distinct clusters of begomoviruses. Begomoviruses infecting tomato, chilli and dolichos have been reported previously, and those infecting Ageratum, Croton, okra, papaya, pumpkin and yardlong bean are described for the first time. Phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene sequences of 21 B. tabaci from Bangladesh and other reference sequences grouped them into at least two independent clusters. Some sequences from different countries, e.g., Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Thailand were almost identical while others collected from plants within the same field diverged by as much as 15%, indicating high diversity even at the local level. None of the B. tabaci from Bangladesh grouped with the reference B- and Q-biotype sequences, thus these two aggressive biotypes were apparently absent from Bangladesh.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: biotype, Cytochrome oxidase, I gene, Geminivirus diversity, phylogenetics, population genetics, virus-specific primers
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 16 May 2016 10:41
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2381

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