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Crops that feed the world: Production and improvement of cassava for food, feed, and industrial uses

Crops that feed the world: Production and improvement of cassava for food, feed, and industrial uses

Parmar, Aditya, Sturm, Barbara and Hensel, Oliver (2017) Crops that feed the world: Production and improvement of cassava for food, feed, and industrial uses. Food Security, 9 (5). pp. 907-927. ISSN 1876-4517 (Print), 1876-4525 (Online) (doi:10.1007/s12571-017-0717-8)

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Abstract

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the oldest root and tuber crops, used by humans to produce food, feed and beverages. Currently, cassava is produced in more than 100 countries and fulfils the daily caloric demands of millions of people living in tropical America, Africa, and Asia. Its impor-tance as a food security crop is high in Western, Central and Eastern Africa due to its ability to produce reasonable yields (\~10 t/ha) in poor soils and with minimal inputs. Traditionally a famine reserve and a subsistence crop, the status of cassava is now evolving fast as a cash crop and as raw material in the production of starch (and starch based products), energy (bio-ethanol) and livestock feed in the major producing countries. Cassava leaves, which are rich in protein and beta-carotenoids, are also used as a vegetable and forage (fresh or dehydrated meal) in various parts of the world. In recent years, some of the prob-lems in the production of cassava have been increasing infection with cassava mosaic disease (CMD), cassava brown streak dis-ease (CBSD) and cassava bacterial blight (CBB). Inherent post-harvest physiological disorder (PPD) and cyanogenic glycosides (CG) are some of the most prominent challenges for scientists, producers and consumers in the post-production systems. Collaborative research in participatory plant breeding is ongoing at leading international research institutes such as IITA and CIAT to improve crop resistance to virus diseases, reduce PPD and CG, and improve the overall nutritional characteristics. Further re-search should also focus on post-production systems by developing enhanced storage and transportation techniques, mechanisation (peeling, size reduction, drying and dewatering) and improved packaging. Moreover, a robust national policy, market development, and dissemination and extension program are required to realise the full potential of innovations and technologies in cassava production and processing.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cassava, Cassava breeding, Cassava brown streak disease, Cassava leaves, Cassava mosaic disease, Cyanogenic glucosides, Manihot esculenta, Postharvest physiological disorder
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2018 17:27
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/19366

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