Skip navigation

Particle motion and heat transfer in an upward-flowing dense particle suspension: application in solar receivers

Particle motion and heat transfer in an upward-flowing dense particle suspension: application in solar receivers

García-Triñanes, P., Seville, J.P.K., Ansart, R., Benoit, H., T.W., Leadbeater and D.J., Parker (2017) Particle motion and heat transfer in an upward-flowing dense particle suspension: application in solar receivers. Chemical Engineering Science, 177. pp. 313-322. ISSN 0009-2509 (Print), 1873-4405 (Online) (doi:10.1016/j.ces.2017.11.041)

[img] PDF (Author Accepted Manuscript)
18233 GARCIA-TRINANES_Particle_Motion_and_Heat_Transfer_2017.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 November 2018.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Concentrated solar power (CSP) plants conventionally make use of molten salt as the heat transfer medium, which transfers heat between the solar receiver and a steam turbine power circuit. A new approach uses particles of a heat-resistant particulate medium in the form of many dense upward-moving fluidised beds contained within an array of vertical tubes within the solar receiver. In most dense gas-solid fluidisation systems, particle circulation is induced by bubble motion and is the primary cause of particle convective heat transfer, which is the major contributing mechanism to overall heat transfer. The current work describes experiments designed to investigate the relationship between this solids convection and the heat transfer coefficient between the bed and the tube wall, which is shown to depend on the local particle concentration and their rate of renewal at the wall. Experiments were performed using 65 µm silicon carbide particles in a tube of diameter 30mm, replicating the conditions used in the real application. Solids motion and time-averaged solids concentration were measured using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) and local heat transfer coefficients measured using small probes which employ electrical resistance heating and thermocouple temperature measurement. Results show that, as for other types of bubbling beds, the heat transfer coefficient first increases as the gas flow rate increases (because the rate of particle renewal at the wall increases), before passing through a maximum and decreasing again as the reducing local solids concentration at the wall becomes the dominant effect. Measured heat transfer coefficients are compared with theoretical approaches by Mickley and Fairbanks packet model and Thring correlation. The close correspondence between heat transfer coefficient and solids movement is here demonstrated by PEPT for the first time in a dense upward-moving fluidised bed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Solar energy; Fluidisation; Dense particle suspension; Heat transfer; Wall region contact time
Subjects: T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Applied Engineering & Management
Last Modified: 03 May 2018 11:39
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/18233

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics