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Lifetime self-reported arthritis is associated with elevated levels of mental health burden: A multi-national cross sectional study across 46 low- and middle-income countries

Lifetime self-reported arthritis is associated with elevated levels of mental health burden: A multi-national cross sectional study across 46 low- and middle-income countries

Stubbs, Brendon, Veronese, Nicola, Vancampfort, Davy, Thompson, Trevor ORCID: 0000-0001-9880-782X, Kohler, Cristiano, Schofield, Patricia, Solmi, Marco, Mugisha, James, Kahl, Kai G., Pillinger, Toby, Carvalho, Andre F. and Koyanagi, Ai (2017) Lifetime self-reported arthritis is associated with elevated levels of mental health burden: A multi-national cross sectional study across 46 low- and middle-income countries. Scientific Reports, 7 (1):7138. pp. 1-11. ISSN 2045-2322 (Print), 2045-2322 (Online) (doi:10.1038/s41598-017-07688-6)

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Abstract

Population-based studies investigating the relationship of arthritis with mental health outcomes are lacking, particularly among low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We investigated the relationship between arthritis and mental health (depression spectrum, psychosis spectrum, anxiety, sleep disturbances and stress) across community-dwelling adults aged ≥18 years across 46 countries from the World Health Survey. Symptoms of psychosis and depression were established using questions from the Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Severity of anxiety, sleep problems, and stress sensitivity over the preceding 30 days were self-reported. Self-report lifetime history of arthritis was collected, including presence or absence of symptoms suggestive of arthritis: pain, sti ness or swelling of joints over the preceding 12-months. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were undertaken. Overall, 245,706 individuals were included. Having arthritis increased the odds of subclinical psychosis (OR = 1.85; 95%CI = 1.72–1.99) and psychosis (OR = 2.48; 95%CI = 2.05–3.01). People with arthritis were at increased odds of subsyndromal depression (OR = 1.92; 95%CI = 1.64–2.26), a brief depressive episode (OR = 2.14; 95%CI = 1.88–2.43) or depressive episode (OR = 2.43; 95%CI = 2.21–2.67). Arthritis was also associated with increased odds for anxiety (OR = 1.75; 95%CI = 1.63–1.88), sleep problems (OR = 2.23; 95%CI = 2.05– 2.43) and perceived stress (OR = 1.43; 95%CI = 1.33–1.53). Results were similar for middle-income and low-income countries. Integrated interventions addressing arthritis and mental health comorbidities are warranted to tackle this considerable burden.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Epidemiology; Osteoarthritis
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Applied Psychology Research Group
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2017 11:29
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/17523

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