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From agricultural benefits to aviation safety: Realizing the potential of continent-wide radar networks

From agricultural benefits to aviation safety: Realizing the potential of continent-wide radar networks

Bauer, Silke, Chapman, Jason W., Reynolds, Don R., Alves, José A., Dokter, Adriaan M., Menz, Myles M. H., Sapir, Nir, Ciach, Michał, Pettersson, Lars B., Kelly, Jeffrey F., Leijnse, Hidde and Shamoun-Baranes, Judy (2017) From agricultural benefits to aviation safety: Realizing the potential of continent-wide radar networks. BioScience, 67 (10). pp. 912-918. ISSN 0006-3568 (Print), 1525-3244 (Online) (doi:10.1093/biosci/bix074)

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Abstract

Migratory animals provide a multitude of services and disservices—with benefits or costs in the order of billions of dollars annually. Monitoring, quantifying, and forecasting migrations across continents could assist diverse stakeholders in utilizing migrant services, reducing disservices, or mitigating human–wildlife conflicts. Radars are powerful tools for such monitoring as they can assess directional intensities, such as migration traffic rates, and biomass transported. Currently, however, most radar applications are local or small scale and therefore substantially limited in their ability to address large-scale phenomena. As weather radars are organized into continent-wide networks and also detect “biological targets,” they could routinely monitor aerial migrations over the relevant spatial scales and over the timescales required for detecting responses to environmental perturbations. To tap these unexploited resources, a concerted effort is needed among diverse fields of expertise and among stakeholders to recognize the value of the existing infrastructure and data beyond weather forecasting.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2017 12:04
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/17459

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