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An examination of training on the VertiMax Resisted Jumping Device for improvements in lower body power in highly trained college athletes

An examination of training on the VertiMax Resisted Jumping Device for improvements in lower body power in highly trained college athletes

Rhea, Matthew R., Peterson, Mark D., Oliverson, Jeff R., Naclerio Ayllón, Fernando ORCID: 0000-0001-7405-4894 and Potenziano, Ben J. (2008) An examination of training on the VertiMax Resisted Jumping Device for improvements in lower body power in highly trained college athletes. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 22 (3). pp. 735-740. ISSN 1064-8011 (Print), 1533-4287 (Online) (doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181660d61)

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Abstract

Training to develop superior muscular power has become a key component to most progressive sport conditioning programs. Conventional resistance training, plyometrics, and speed/agility modalities have all been employed in an effort to realize superlative combinations of training stimuli. New training devices such as the VertiMax resisted jump trainer are marketed as a means of improving lower body reactive power. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the VertiMax, in combination with traditional training modalities, for improvements in lower body power among highly trained athletes. Forty men and women Division I collegiate athletes representing the sports of baseball, basketball, soccer, gymnastics, and track completed a 12-week mixed-methods training program. Two groups were constructed with both groups performing the same conventional resistance training and strength training exercises. The training control group performed traditional plyometric exercises while the experimental group performed similar loaded jump training on the VertiMax. Lower body power was measured before and after the training program by the TENDO FiTROdyne Powerlizer and statistically compared for differences between groups. Data analyses identified a significant (p < 0.05) and meaningful difference between power development among the 2 groups, with the VertiMax eliciting a greater treatment effect (effect size = 0.54) over conventional resistance and plyometric training alone (effect size = 0.09). These data convincingly demonstrate that the VertiMax represents an effective strategy for developing lower body power among trained college athletes, when combined with traditional strength and conditioning approaches.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: VertiMax; Plyometric exercise; Power; Speed; Physical conditioning
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Last Modified: 23 Feb 2017 12:03
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/16335

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