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Marine litter education boosts children’s understanding and self-reported actions

Marine litter education boosts children’s understanding and self-reported actions

Hartley, Bonny L., Thompson, Richard C. and Pahl, Sabine (2014) Marine litter education boosts children’s understanding and self-reported actions. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 90 (1-2). pp. 209-217. ISSN 0025-326X (Print), 1879-3363 (Online) (doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.10.049)

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Abstract

Marine litter is a significant environmental problem inherently linked to individuals’ purchasing, use and disposal behaviour. This research examined 176 British schoolchildren’s (aged 8–13 years) baseline marine litter understanding and self-reported actions, and tested the impact of an educational intervention. All children participated in the educational intervention and completed a pre- and post-intervention questionnaire. At baseline, children were quite concerned about marine litter and recognised some of the causes and impacts of the problem. Children also reported taking a number of actions to help solve the problem. After the intervention, children were significantly more concerned, had a better understanding of the causes and negative impacts, and reported engaging in more actions to reduce the potential causes of marine litter. Understanding the perceptions and behaviours of children is crucial as they represent current and future actors and a potentially important source of social influence among their peers, parents and community.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Marine debris; Perception; Children; Environment; Education
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB1501 Primary Education
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Applied Psychology Research Group
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 19 Apr 2017 16:26
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/16048

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