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Investigation of the permeation of model formulations and a commercial ibuprofen formulation in Carbosil® and human skin using ATR-FTIR and multivariate spectral analysis

Investigation of the permeation of model formulations and a commercial ibuprofen formulation in Carbosil® and human skin using ATR-FTIR and multivariate spectral analysis

Russeau, Wanessa, Mitchell, John ORCID: 0000-0003-2945-3292, Tetteh, John, Lane, Majella E. and Hadgraft, Jonathan (2009) Investigation of the permeation of model formulations and a commercial ibuprofen formulation in Carbosil® and human skin using ATR-FTIR and multivariate spectral analysis. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 374 (1-2). pp. 17-25. ISSN 0378-5173 (doi:10.1016/j.ijpharm.2009.02.018)

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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to use attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and target factor analysis (TFA) to investigate the permeation of model drugs and formulation components through Carbosil® membrane and human skin. Diffusion studies of saturated solutions in 50:50 water/ethanol of methyl paraben (MP), ibuprofen (IBU) and caffeine (CF) were performed on Carbosil® membrane. The spectroscopic data were analysed by target factor analysis, and evolution profiles of the signal for each component (i.e. the drug, water, ethanol and membrane) over time were obtained. Results showed that the data were successfully deconvoluted as correlations between factors from the data and reference spectra of the components, were above 0.8 in all cases. Good reproducibility over three runs for the evolution profiles was obtained. From the evolution profiles it was observed that water diffused better through the Carbosil® membrane than ethanol, confirming the hydrophilic properties of the Carbosil® membrane used. IBU diffused slower compared with MP and CF. The evolution profile of CF was very similar to that of water, probably because of the high solubility of CF in water, indicating that both compounds are diffusing concurrently. The second part of the work involved a study of the evolution profiles of the components of a commercial topical gel containing 5% (w/w) of ibuprofen as it permeated through human skin. Although the system was much more complex, data were still successfully deconvoluted and the different components of the formulation identified except for benzyl alcohol which might be attributed to the low concentrations of benzyl alcohol used in topical formulations. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Available online 9 March 2009
Uncontrolled Keywords: ATR-FTIR, Carbosil ®, skin, methyl paraben, Ibuprofen, caffeine
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
R Medicine > RS Pharmacy and materia medica
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Pharmaceutical, Chemical & Environmental Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2016 16:27
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/1598

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