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Aspects of Love: the effect of mortality salience and attachment style on romantic beliefs

Aspects of Love: the effect of mortality salience and attachment style on romantic beliefs

Smith, Rebecca and Massey, Emma (2013) Aspects of Love: the effect of mortality salience and attachment style on romantic beliefs. Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 66 (2). pp. 135-151. ISSN 0030-2228 (Print), 1541-3764 (Online)

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Abstract

Two studies are reported which explore romance as a means of terror management for participants with secure and insecure attachment styles. Mikulincer and Florian (2000) have shown that whilst mortality salience increases the desire for intimacy in securely attached individuals, the insecurely attached use cultural world views rather than close relationships to cope with fear of death. Study 1 used the romantic belief scale to compare the effects of attachment style and mortality salience on the cultural aspects of close relationships and showed that the only the insecurely attached were more romantic following mortality salience. Study 2 replicated this effect and demonstrated that this difference was not simply due to lower self esteem in the insecurely attached. The additional inclusion of the Relationship assessment questionnaire failed to provide any evidence that the securely attached were effected by the mortality salience manipulation, even on a more interpersonal measure.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Mortality Salience; Attachment style
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Applied Psychology Research Group
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2017 16:06
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/15542

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