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Monitoring of carbon dioxide uptake in accelerated carbonation processes applied to air pollution control residues

Monitoring of carbon dioxide uptake in accelerated carbonation processes applied to air pollution control residues

Alfieri, Felice, Gunning, Peter, Gallo, Michela, Del Borghi, Adriana and Hills, Colin (2012) Monitoring of carbon dioxide uptake in accelerated carbonation processes applied to air pollution control residues. In: Proceedings of ECOS 2012 - The 25th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems. Firenze University Press, Perugia, Italy, pp. 205-217. ISBN 978-88-6655-322-9

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Abstract

The application of Accelerated Carbonation Technology (ACT) has potential for the sequestration of carbon in waste and geological materials. ACT also has potential to be supported by carbon credit mechanisms based upon the amount of carbon sequestered from industrial emissions. For this to happen, the routine monitoring of CO2 sequestered into the solid phase is required for the planning and operation of any accelerated carbonation plant. The present paper reports the preliminary results from an assessment of existing methods for measuring CO2 imbibed into a solid by an accelerated carbonation processes. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out to evaluate the accuracy of methodologies for measuring mineralised carbon including: loss on ignition, acid digestion and total carbon analysis. The CO2 reactivity of several wastes from municipal incineration known as Air Pollution Control residues (APCr) were also included in the study. A detailed characterisation of the materials being carbonated, using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ion chromatography was carried out. The results of this study showed that monitoring CO2 during accelerated carbonation is made difficult by the complex mineralogy of materials such as APCrs. As such, the presence of calcium bearing species and polymorphs of calcium carbonate formed varied between the materials investigated. The use of an acid digestion technique was not subject to interference from the chemistry or mineralogy of an ash. Among the investigated methods, acid digestion gives the most promising results as it provided robust data on the amount of carbon imbibed during processing.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Title of Proceedings: Proceedings of ECOS 2012 - The 25th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems
Additional Information: Conference held from 26-29 June 2012, Perugia
Uncontrolled Keywords: carbon dioxide, CO2, monitoring, accelerated carbonation, waste, air pollution control residue, APCr, APC
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Engineering
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:36
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/14564

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