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Intensity-dependent reductions in resting blood pressure following short-term isometric exercise training

Intensity-dependent reductions in resting blood pressure following short-term isometric exercise training

Gill, Kyle F., Arthur, Susan T., Swaine, Ian, Deverux, Gavin, Huet, Yvette M., Wikstrom, Erik, Cordova, Mitchell L. and Howden, Reuben (2014) Intensity-dependent reductions in resting blood pressure following short-term isometric exercise training. Journal of Sports Sciences, 33 (6). pp. 616-621. ISSN 0264-0414 (Print), 1466-447X (Online) (doi:10.1080/02640414.2014.953979)

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Abstract

To reduce resting blood pressure, a minimum isometric exercise training (IET) intensity has been suggested, but this is not known for short-term IET programmes. We therefore compared the effects of moderate- and low-intensity IET programmes on resting blood pressure. Forty normotensive participants (22.3 ± 3.4 years; 69.5 ± 15.5 kg; 170.2 ± 8.7 cm) were randomly assigned to groups of differing training intensities [20%EMGpeak (~23%MVC, maximum voluntary contraction, or 30%EMGpeak (~34%MVC)] or control group; 3 weeks of IET at 30%EMGpeak resulted in significant reductions in resting mean arterial pressure (e.g. −3.9 ± 1.0 mmHg, P < 0.001), whereas 20%EMGpeak did not (−2.3 ± 2.9 mmHg; P > 0.05). Moreover, after pooling all female versus male participants, IET induced a 6.9-mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure in female participants, but only a 1.5-mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure in male participants, although the difference was not significant. An IET intensity between 20%EMGpeak and 30%EMGpeak is sufficient to elicit significant resting blood pressure reductions in a short-term training period (3 weeks). In addition, sexual dimorphism may exist in the magnitude of reductions, but further work is required to confirm this possibility, which could be important in understanding the mechanisms responsible.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 3rd Oct. 2014, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2014.953979
Uncontrolled Keywords: Isometric exercise training, Resting blood pressure, Isometric exercise intensity
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Centre for Science and Medicine in Sport and Exercise
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2017 00:38
Selected for GREAT 2016: GREAT b
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/14351

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