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Lactate accumulation following isometric exercise training and its relationship with reduced resting blood pressure

Lactate accumulation following isometric exercise training and its relationship with reduced resting blood pressure

Devereux, Gavin R., Coleman, Damian, Wiles, Jonathan D. and Swaine, Ian (2012) Lactate accumulation following isometric exercise training and its relationship with reduced resting blood pressure. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30 (11). pp. 1141-1148. ISSN 0264-0414 (Print), 1466-447X (Online) (doi:10.1080/02640414.2012.692482)

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was (a) to assess lactate accumulation during isometric exercise, and to quantify the shifts in accumulation following isometric training; and (b) to relate any training-induced changes in lactate accumulation to reductions in resting blood pressure. Eleven male participants undertook isometric training for a 4-week period using bilateral-leg exercise. Training caused reductions in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial resting blood pressure (of -4.9 ± 6.3 mmHg, P = 0.01; -2.6 ± 3.0 mmHg, P = 0.01; and -2.6 ± 2.3 mmHg, P = 0.001 respectively; mean ± s). These were accompanied by changes in muscle activity, taken as electromyographic activity to reach a given lactate concentration (from 114 ± 22 to 131 ± 27 mV and from 136 ± 25 to 155 ± 34 mV for 3 and 4 mmol · L -1 respectively. Training intensity expressed relative to peak lactate was correlated with reduced resting systolic and mean arterial blood pressure. Training caused significant shifts in lactate accumulation, and reductions in resting blood pressure are strongly related to training intensity, when expressed relative to pre-training peak lactate. This suggests that higher levels of local muscle anaerobiosis may promote the training-induced reductions in resting blood pressure. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: leg extension, cardiovascular function, electromyography
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure
Q Science > QP Physiology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:33
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13671

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