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Musculoskeletal pain characteristics associated with lower balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults

Musculoskeletal pain characteristics associated with lower balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults

Stubbs, B., Schofield, P., Patchay, S. and Leveille, S. (2015) Musculoskeletal pain characteristics associated with lower balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults. Physiotherapy, 102 (2). pp. 152-158. ISSN 0031-9406 (doi:10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.3721)

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Abstract

Objective: To determine whether musculoskeletal pain (pain severity and number of chronic pain sites; single or multisite) is associated with balance confidence over and above previously established risk factors.

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Setting: Ten community sites (five day centres, two sheltered housing schemes and three community ‘clubs’) in the UK.

Participants: Two hundred and eighty-nine community-dwelling older adults [response rate 72%, mean age 78 (standard deviation 8) years, 67% female] completed the study assessment. Eligibility criteria were as follows: living in the community; aged ≥60 years; able to walk ≥10 m; able to communicate in English; and no cognitive (e.g. dementia), neurological or mental health conditions.

Interventions: Not applicable.

Main outcome measure: Balance confidence as measured by the 16-item Activities Balance Confidence (ABC) scale (lower scores indicate less confidence).

Results: One hundred and fifty participants had at least one site of chronic musculoskeletal pain (52%), and the remaining 139 (48%) participants did not report chronic musculoskeletal pain. Older people with chronic musculoskeletal pain had significantly lower scores on the ABC scale compared with those without chronic musculoskeletal pain (mean 48.3 vs 71.3, P < 0.001). After adjustment for established risk factors, two separate hierarchical regression models demonstrated that both pain severity (β=-0.106, P = 0.029) and number of chronic musculoskeletal pain sites (β=-0.98, P = 0.023) were significantly associated with lower balance confidence.

Conclusion: Both pain severity and number of chronic pain sites (particularly multisite pain) are associated with lower balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults. Further research is needed to target pain symptoms and balance confidence in relation to fall risk in older adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Balance confidence; Chronic musculoskeletal pain; Pain; Falls; Older adults
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2017 11:37
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT b
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13634

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