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Sustainable energy projects and the community: mapping single building use of microgeneration technologies in London

Sustainable energy projects and the community: mapping single building use of microgeneration technologies in London

Coles, Anne-Marie, Piterou, Athena and Genus, Audley (2015) Sustainable energy projects and the community: mapping single building use of microgeneration technologies in London. Urban Studies, 53 (9). pp. 1869-1884. ISSN 0042-0980 (Print), 1360-063X (Online) (doi:10.1177/0042098015581575)

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Abstract

Microgeneration technologies offer the potential for distributed energy supply and consumption resulting in reduced reliance on centralised generation. Adoption of microgeneration for use in community settings is usually understood as having a beneficial contribution to sustainable development. This is particularly relevant in urban environments which present specific challenges relating to the heterogeneity of building and land use. Small-scale installations in buildings also appear to offer technological flexibility at the ‘human’ level, necessary for local participation in shaping the direction of sustainable development. This paper reports on a project concerned with identifying on-site energy generation projects in Greater London. A database was compiled comprising renewable and energy efficient microgeneration installations in multi-occupancy buildings. The relationships between each project and its associated organisations are mapped as a social network, which illustrates the heterogeneity of technologies and actors involved, as well as the flows of funding and expertise. The structure of the resulting networks indicates a lack of participation by social or not-for-profit groups who are traditionally identified as community level actors. The findings indicate that large institutional actors on the supply side may become regarded as renewable energy experts. Hence, there is a need to consider how the concept of community level actors in urban microgeneration projects is applicable to local government and commercial organisations.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Funding: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for- profit sectors.
Uncontrolled Keywords: community engagement, microgeneration in buildings, renewable energy policy, social network analysis, urban sustainability
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Systems Management & Strategy
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2017 14:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: GREAT b
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13474

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