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Transforming mortality inequalities: A case of countering gender-based violence with education for social justice

Transforming mortality inequalities: A case of countering gender-based violence with education for social justice

Chopra, Priti (2014) Transforming mortality inequalities: A case of countering gender-based violence with education for social justice. In: International conference on Power, Politics and Priorities for Comparative and International Education, BAICE 2014, 8-10 September 2014, University of Bath, UK. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The Lancet Commission (2010) review of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) for gender equality and empowerment problematised, amongst other aspects, gaps in the international and national prioritisation of concerns regarding reproductive health rights and violence against women. Matters of equity and ownership consistently emerge as significant challenges in applying a rights-based approach, to issues of justice for women (Kabeer 2003, Heyzer 2005) through education (Unterhalter 2010). According to Sen (2001) gender-based mortality inequalities are a global reality- especially in Asia and North Africa. This paper draws on ethnographic research with different dais (traditional midwives) practicing and resisting female infanticide in two villages in Bihar, India. Through ethnographic vignettes the paper explores ways in which gender-based mortality inequalities are intertwined with socio-economic and cultural relations, within the institution of family and in wider society, creating collusion between dais, families and patriarchal roles and values that perpetuate the practice of female infanticide (see Janaki, Chandrasekarayya, and Murthy 2011). Examining the multifaceted dimensions of moral and critical agency, in research consultation with those whose experiences are impacted at all levels, may begin to open collectively generated spaces and opportunities for social transformation in the practice of female infanticide. The findings of this study suggest that complexities presented by health, social, cultural, economic and education challenges may begin to be addressed if holistic and integrated policy approaches, underpinned by an ethical commitment to social justice in processes of education are adopted (see Holst 2002, Hickey and Mitlin 2009, Waage et al 2010).

Item Type: Conference or Conference Paper (Lecture)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Gender, Education, Social justice, Female infanticide, India
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:32
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13288

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