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The role of materialism on social, emotional and behavioural difficulties for British adolescents

The role of materialism on social, emotional and behavioural difficulties for British adolescents

Maras, Pam, Moon, Amy ORCID: 0000-0001-5795-3206, Gupta, Taveeshi and Gridley, Nicole (2014) The role of materialism on social, emotional and behavioural difficulties for British adolescents. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 20 (4). pp. 362-380. ISSN 1363-2752 (Print), 1741-2692 (Online) (doi:10.1080/13632752.2014.989055)

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Abstract

The relationship between materialism and social-emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBDs) was assessed by comparing a sample of adolescents receiving in-school behavioural support with adolescents not receiving any support. All participants completed the Youth Materialism Scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Binary logistic regression indicated that adolescents who reported higher levels of materialism were more likely to be classified into a group considered ‘at-risk’ for developing conduct and peer problems. Hierarchical logistic regression assessed the moderation of behavioural support and indicated that adolescents in receipt of behavioural support who reported higher levels of materialism were at a greater risk of hyperactivity in comparison to those who receive support but reported lower levels of materialism. For adolescents not receiving behavioural support, less materialistic attitudes placed them at a greater risk of hyperactivity. These findings highlight the importance of distinguishing between different SEBD typologies and the potential effects of materialism during adolescence.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Acknowledgements (funding): This work was supported by the Nuffield Foundation [grant number SGS/32035].
Uncontrolled Keywords: Materialism; SEBDs; Behaviour difficulties; Adolescence
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2017 20:16
Selected for GREAT 2016: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12752

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