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Do people with mental illness receive adequate smoking cessation advice? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Do people with mental illness receive adequate smoking cessation advice? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Mitchell, Alex J., Vancampfort, Davy, De Hert, Marc and Stubbs, Brendon (2015) Do people with mental illness receive adequate smoking cessation advice? A systematic review and meta-analysis. General Hospital Psychiatry, 37 (1). pp. 14-23. ISSN 0163-8343 (doi:10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2014.11.006)

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Abstract

Background:
Prevalence rates of smoking in people with mental illness are high and premature mortality attributed to tobacco related physical comorbidity is a major concern. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing rates of receipt of smoking cessation advice among people with and without mental illness.

Method:
Major electronic databases were searched from inception till August 2014 for studies comparing rates of receipt of smoking cessation advice of people with and without a mental illness. Two independent authors completed methodological appraisal and extracted data. A random effects meta-analysis was utilized.

Results:
Seven studies of satisfactory methodological quality (n mental illness = 68,811, n control = 652,847) were included. Overall there was no significant difference in smoking cessation advice rates between those with and without a mental illness (RR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.94 – 1.11-, n = 721,658, Q = 1421, p < 0.001). Subgroup analyses demonstrated people with severe mental illness (SMI) received comparable rates of smoking cessation advice to those without SMI (RR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.98-1.2, n = 559,122). This remained true for people with schizophrenia (RR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.68-1.70) and bipolar disorder (RR = 1.14, 95% CI 0.85-1.5). People with non-severe mental illnesses were slightly more likely to receive smoking cessation advice (RR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.04-1.30, Q = 1364, p < 0.001, n = 580,206).

Conclusions:
People with SMI receive similar smoking cessation advice rates as people without mental illness, whilst those with non-severe mental illness are slightly more likely to receive smoking cessation advice. Whilst progress has been made, offering smoking cessation advice should receive a higher priority in everyday clinical practice for patients with a mental health diagnosis.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] The Accepted Manuscript version is attached to this record. Please cite this article as: Mitchell Alex J., Vancampfort Davy, De Hert Marc, Stubbs Brendon, Do people with mental illness receive adequate smoking cessation advice? A systematic review and meta-analysis, General Hospital Psychiatry (2014), doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2014.11.006. [2] Publisher's note (Elsevier): This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
Uncontrolled Keywords: mental illness, smoking cessation, advice
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2016 11:01
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12592

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