Skip navigation

Transcriptional response of virus-infected cassava and identification of putative sources of resistance for cassava brown streak disease

Transcriptional response of virus-infected cassava and identification of putative sources of resistance for cassava brown streak disease

Maruthi, M.N. ORCID: 0000-0002-8060-866X, Bouvaine, Sophie, Tufan, Hale A., Mohammed, Ibrahim U. and Hillocks, Rory J. (2014) Transcriptional response of virus-infected cassava and identification of putative sources of resistance for cassava brown streak disease. PLoS ONE, 9 (5):e96642. ISSN 1932-6203 (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096642)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Publisher's PDF (Open Access))
12541 MARUTHI_Transcriptional_Response_Cassava_Brown_Streak_Disease_2014.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (443kB) | Preview
[img] PDF (Author Accepted Manuscript)
12541_MARUTHI_Manuscript_(2)_PLoSONE_(accepted_8April2014).pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (408kB)
[img] PDF (Acceptance Email)
12541_MARUTHI_Acceptance_email_PLoS_ONE_(9April2014).pdf - Additional Metadata
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (193kB)

Abstract

Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a major food staple in sub-Saharan Africa, which is severely affected by cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). The aim of this study was to identify resistance for CBSD as well as to understand the mechanism of putative resistance for providing effective control for the disease. Three cassava varieties; Kaleso, Kiroba and Albert were inoculated with cassava brown streak viruses by grafting and also using the natural insect vector the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. Kaleso expressed mild or no disease symptoms and supported low concentrations of viruses, which is a characteristic of resistant plants. In comparison, Kiroba expressed severe leaf but milder root symptoms, while Albert was susceptible with severe symptoms both on leaves and roots. Real-time PCR was used to estimate virus concentrations in cassava varieties. Virus quantities were higher in Kiroba and Albert compared to Kaleso. The Illumina RNA-sequencing was used to further understand the genetic basis of resistance. More than 700 genes were uniquely overexpressed in Kaleso in response to virus infection compared to Albert. Surprisingly, none of them were similar to known resistant gene orthologs. Some of the overexpressed genes, however, belonged to the hormone signalling pathways and secondary metabolites, both of which are linked to plant resistance. These genes should be further characterised before confirming their role in resistance to CBSD.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Copyright: (c) 2014 Maruthi et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. [2] Acknowledgements (funding): The authors acknowledge the funding received for part of this work from the African Union Commission through the grant: AURG/2/141/2012. Some of the costs were covered internally by the University of Greenwich by employing HAT for carrying out this work (grant ID E0198).
Uncontrolled Keywords: Africa, cassava, virus disease, resistance genes, transcriptional analysis, RNA-Seq
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2017 09:08
Selected for GREAT 2016: GREAT b
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12541

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics