Skip navigation

Regulated irrigation of woody ornamentals to improve plant quality and precondition against drought stress

Regulated irrigation of woody ornamentals to improve plant quality and precondition against drought stress

Cameron, R., Harrison-Murray, R., Fordham, M., Wilkinson, S., Davies, W., Atkinson, C. and Else, M. (2008) Regulated irrigation of woody ornamentals to improve plant quality and precondition against drought stress. Annals of Applied Biology, 153 (1). pp. 49-61. ISSN 0003-4746 (Print), 1744-7348 (Online) (doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.2008.00237.x)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Regulated irrigation has the potential to improve crop quality in woody ornamentals by reducing excessive vigour and promoting a more compact habit. This research aimed to compare the effectiveness and the mode of action of two techniques, regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) and partial root drying (PRD), when applied to container-grown ornamentals through drip irrigation. Results showed that RDI and PRD reduced growth in Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’, but in Forsythia x intermedia ‘Lynwood’, significant reductions were recorded only with RDI. Physiological measurements in Forsythia indicated that reductions in stomatal conductance (gs) occurred in both treatments, but those in the RDI tended to be more persistent. Reduced gs in PRD was consistent with the concept that chemical signals from the root can regulate stomatal aperture alone; however, the data also suggested that optimising the growth reduction required a moderate degree of shoot water deficit (i.e. a hydraulic signal to be imposed). As RDI was associated with tissue water deficit, it was used in a second experiment to determine the potential of this technique to precondition container-grown plants against subsequent drought stress (e.g. during retail stages or after planting out). Speed of acclimation would be important in a commercial context, and the results demonstrated that both slow and rapid imposition of RDI enabled Forsythia plants to acclimate against later drought events. This article discusses the potential to both improve ornamental plant quality and enhance tolerance to subsequent adverse conditions through controlled, regulated irrigation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Acknowledgements (funding): The authors would like to thank Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Horticulture LINK and the Horticultural Development Council, UK for their help in funding this research [2] Copyright: © 2008 The Authors Journal compilation © 2008 Association of Applied Biologists
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cotinus, drought acclimation, Forsythia, ornamental plant quality, partial root drying, regulated deficit irrigation, water relations
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 18 Aug 2015 13:54
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12481

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item