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Impact of spatio-temporal simulations of rat damage on yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.) and implications for rodent pest management

Impact of spatio-temporal simulations of rat damage on yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.) and implications for rodent pest management

Mulungu, L. S., Lagwen, P. P., Mdangi, M. E., Kilonzo, B. S. and Belmain, S. R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545 (2014) Impact of spatio-temporal simulations of rat damage on yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.) and implications for rodent pest management. International Journal of Pest Management, 60 (4). pp. 269-274. ISSN 0967-0874 (Print), 1366-5863 (Online) (doi:10.1080/09670874.2014.967326)

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Abstract

Rodents often damage crops throughout the growing season, from germination to harvest, thus making it difficult to understand the cumulative effects of rodent damage for crops such as rice that are able to partially compensate for damage. Compensation can make it difficult to understand the impact of variable rodent damage in terms of when the damage occurs, its severity and thus when, whether and how rodent pests should be controlled. The compensatory responses of rice to simulated rat damage carried out at different growth stages and at different spatial levels of severity showed that higher yield was recorded during the wet season in comparison to the dry season. However, yield loss was observed during all cropping stages for all levels of simulated damage for wet and dry season crops, with significant compensation noted at the transplanting [14 days after sowing (DAS)] and vegetative (45 DAS) stages. Only damage at the maturity (110 DAS) stage resulted in significant reductions in rice crop yield. Seasonal differences suggest water availability was an important factor that perhaps enhanced rice production. The ability of rice to compensate for early rodent damage could potentially reduce a farmer's perception of damage. However, failing to control rodents at these earlier crop growth stages could lead to increased rodent populations at the time of maturity when compensatory effects are limited.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] The Author's Accepted Manuscript version has been uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in International Journal of Pest Management on 10/10/2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09670874.2014.967326 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09670874.2014.967326. [2] Acknowledgements (funding): Funding for this work was provided by the Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Fund (ZARDEF) (project number: A-02-41).
Uncontrolled Keywords: yield loss, rodents, crop damage, crop yield
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Pest Behaviour Research Group
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2016 11:06
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12085

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