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Advancing theory and application of cognitive research in sport: Using representative tasks to explain and predict skilled anticipation, decision-making, and option-generation behavior

Advancing theory and application of cognitive research in sport: Using representative tasks to explain and predict skilled anticipation, decision-making, and option-generation behavior

Belling, Patrick K., Suss, Joel and Ward, Paul (2015) Advancing theory and application of cognitive research in sport: Using representative tasks to explain and predict skilled anticipation, decision-making, and option-generation behavior. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 16 (Pt.1). pp. 45-59. ISSN 1469-0292 (doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2014.08.001)

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Abstract

Objectives:
Three main goals were addressed in this research. First, we tested the claims of two cognitive mechanisms that have been proposed to explain expert performance. This was done during assessment and intervention phases of decision making. Second, we tested the validity of an online test of perceptual-cognitive skill in soccer: The Online Assessment of Strategic Skill In Soccer (OASSIS). Third, we compared the OASSIS to other predictors of skill in soccer.

Design:
Over the course of a three-part experiment, participants completed an updated version of the option-generation paradigm employed by Ward, Ericsson, and Williams (2013), the OASSIS, and a battery of other cognitive tests. Performance on these tests was used to inform theory and validate the OASSIS as an applied tool for domain professionals.

Method:
NCAA Division 1 and recreational-level soccer players completed a battery of tests, both using paper/pencil (see Ward et al., 2013) and online.

Results:
Support for Long Term Working Memory theory (LTWM; see Ericsson & Kintsch, 1995) was observed during both phases of decision making, though the prescriptions of the Take-The-First heuristic (see Johnson & Raab, 2003) tend to hold, particularly within intervention phase. When used to predict skill-group membership, the OASSIS accounted for more variance than other domain-general tests of cognition. Furthermore, scores on the OASSIS correlated with other measures of perceptual-cognitive skill in soccer and the process-level predictions made by LTWM.

Conclusions:
Updates to our theoretical understanding of expert performance are provided and the validity of the OASSIS is demonstrated.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] The author's accepted manuscript version is attached. Please cite this article as: Belling, P.K., Suss, J., Ward, P., Advancing theory and application of cognitive research in sport: Using representative tasks to explain and predict skilled anticipation, decision-making, and option-generation behavior, Psychology of Sport & Exercise (2014), doi: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2014.08.001. [2] This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain. [3] The results presented in this manuscript contain extended analyses and report of data presented at the 11th international conference on Naturalistic Decision Making in Marseille, France
Uncontrolled Keywords: anticipation, decision making, option generation, Perceptual-Cognitive Expertise, Long Term Working Memory theory, Take-The-First heuristic
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > QP Physiology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2016 11:35
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12003

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