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Publically different, privately the same: Gender differences and similarities in response to Facebook status updates

Publically different, privately the same: Gender differences and similarities in response to Facebook status updates

Joiner, Richard, Stewart, Caroline, Beaney, Chelsey, Moon, Amy ORCID: 0000-0001-5795-3206, Maras, Pam, Guiller, Jane, Gregory, Helen, Gavin, Jeff, Cromby, John and Brosnan, Mark (2014) Publically different, privately the same: Gender differences and similarities in response to Facebook status updates. Computers in Human Behavior, 39. pp. 165-169. ISSN 0747-5632 (doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.07.004)

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Abstract

Social networking sites (SNS), and especially Facebook, have revolutionised patterns of language and communication. We conducted a study to examine gender differences in language use on Facebook, by surveying 600 undergraduate students (388 females and 207 males), and analysing males’ and females’ responses to two Facebook status updates. There were a number of gender differences in terms of public replies to Facebook status updates. Females were significantly more likely to ‘Like’ a Facebook status update than males, post a public reply to a Facebook status update than males and show higher levels of emotional support than males. In contrast there were hardly any gender differences in terms of sending private messages in response to Facebook status updates. There was no gender difference in terms of level of emotional support in private messages. Females were more likely to send a private message than males, but this difference was very small. The implications of these findings for explanations of gender differences in language are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] The attached version is the Author's Accepted Manuscript (AAM) version. A definitive version was subsequently published in Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 39, October 2014, doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.07.004. [2] Please note that where the full text version provided on GALA is not the final published version, the version made available will be the most up-to-date full-text (author's accepted manuscript or post-print) version as provided by the author(s) and may be subject to embargo. Where possible, or if citing, it is recommended that the publisher’s (definitive) version be consulted to ensure any subsequent changes to the text are noted.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Social networking sites; Facebook; Gender; Language; Context
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2017 20:13
Selected for GREAT 2016: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/11871

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