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Deposition of fluorescent NIPAM-based nanoparticles on solid surfaces: quantitative analysis and the factors affecting it

Deposition of fluorescent NIPAM-based nanoparticles on solid surfaces: quantitative analysis and the factors affecting it

Mohsen, Reham, Thorne, Joanna B., Alexander, Bruce D. and Snowden, Martin J. (2014) Deposition of fluorescent NIPAM-based nanoparticles on solid surfaces: quantitative analysis and the factors affecting it. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 457. pp. 107-115. ISSN 0927-7757 (doi:10.1016/j.colsurfa.2014.05.050)

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Abstract

Recently, responsive surfaces have attracted attention due to their potential applications. Reported research have studied the deposition of environmentally responsive particles on different surfaces, qualitatively tested their response to environmental conditions and studied their possible applications. In this work, novel fluorescent temperature-sensitive nanoparticles were synthesized using a surfactant free emulsion polymerization technique: poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-5% vinyl cinnamate) (p(NIPAM)5%VC). The new particles were characterized using dynamic light scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy. A novel sensitive method for the quantitative analysis of p(NIPAM) 5% VC using fluorescence spectroscopy was developed to determine the concentration of nanoparticle dispersions. This was further used to quantitatively determine the mass of nanoparticles deposited per unit area of glass pre-treated with acid, glass pre-treated with base, quartz, stainless steel, gold and teflon at 25 °C and 60 °C. Factors affecting the adsorption/desorption of the nanoparticles were studied, including the effect of substrate surface charge, surface roughness (using atomic force microscopy, AFM), hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and the temperature at which the adsorption/desorption experiments were carried out. The results show that the effect of surface charge is the most significant, followed by that of surface roughness and temperature. Meanwhile, the influence of the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the surface on the adsorption/desorption of nanoparticles appears to be far less significant than the previously mentioned factors.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, Volume 457, 2014 DOI 10.1016/j.colsurfa.2014.05.050. [2] Please cite this AAM version of the article as: R. Mohsen, J.B. Thorne, B.D. Alexander, M.J. Snowden, Deposition of fluorescent NIPAM-based nanoparticles on solid surfaces: quantitative analysis and the factors affecting it, Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects (2014), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfa.2014.05.050
Uncontrolled Keywords: fluorescent p(NIPAM), vinyl cinnamate, quantitative particle deposition, surface charge and surface roughness
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Pharmaceutical, Chemical & Environmental Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 04 Aug 2017 13:46
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/11494

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