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Localised muscle tissue oxygenation during dynamic exercise with whole body vibration

Localised muscle tissue oxygenation during dynamic exercise with whole body vibration

Robbins, Daniel, Elwell, Clare, Jimenez, Alfonso and Goss-Sampson, Mark (2012) Localised muscle tissue oxygenation during dynamic exercise with whole body vibration. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 11 (2). pp. 346-351. ISSN 1303-2968

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Abstract

Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV) exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS). Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration). Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001) depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: vibration, NIRS, oxygenation, gastrocnemius, heel raise
Subjects: Q Science > QM Human anatomy
Q Science > QP Physiology
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Science
School of Science > Centre for Sports Sciences & Human Performance
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:27
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/11359

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