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The relative importance of crop pests in South Asia (NRI Bulletin No. 39)

The relative importance of crop pests in South Asia (NRI Bulletin No. 39)

Geddes, A.M.W. and Iles, Malcolm (1991) The relative importance of crop pests in South Asia (NRI Bulletin No. 39). [Working Paper]

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Abstract

This is the second in a series of regional studies of crop pest importance carried out by the Natural Resources Institute (NRI). The aim of this study was to assess the relative economic importance of crop pests in the cropping systems of South Asia (defined as India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Pakistan). The area was divided into 30 different cropping system zones and the study provides guidance on which pests are important in each zone and on the zones which are important for particular pests.

Item Type: Working Paper
Additional Information: [1] ISBN: 0-85954-284-X [2] Acknowledgements: Without actually ranking pests the following people helped in various ways with administrative arrangements, introductions or background information (as did many of the respondents listed in Appendix 1). Dr N. S. Randhawa, Director-General, Indian Council of Agricultural Research; Dr Prakash Sarup, Head, Division of Entomology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute; Dr Prem Kishore, Senior Scientist, Division of Entomology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute; Mr D. Chaffey, Natural Resources Adviser, British High Commission, New Delhi, India; Dr J. Paranjape, Senior Development Officer, British High Commission, New Delhi, India; Mr T. D. Hatton, Third Secretary, Development, British High Commission; New Delhi, India; Dr D. McDonald, Acting Program Director, Legumes, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Hyderabad, India; Dr E. A. Siddiq, Project Director, Directorate of Rice Research, Hyderabad, India; Dr R. P. Yadav, Deputy Director, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Nepal; Dr H. P. M. Gunasena, Dean, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; Dr M. H. J. P. Fernando, Director, Central Agricultural Research Institute, Gannoruwa, Sri Lanka; Dr Ranjith Mahindapala, Director, Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka; Mr M. R. Foord, Aid Secretary, British High Commission, Colombo, Sri Lanka; Dr A. J. M. Azizul Islam, Director-General, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, Gazipur; Ms L. Brown, Natural Resources Adviser, British High Commission, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Mr R. J. Leverington, Second Secretary, Aid, British High Commission, Islamabad, Pakistan; Mr Sam Bickersteth of NRI helped with preliminary work on the study, particularly on zoning. Dr P. J. Terry, Institute of Arable Crops Research, Long Ashton, UK, helped with the scientific names of weeds listed for India and provided useful literature on weeds in Pakistan. Dr J. M. Wailer, ODA Plant Pathology Liaison Officer, helped with scientific names of diseases. The CAB International Institute of Entomology, London, helped with scientific names of arthropods. The contribution of all those above to this study is gratefully acknowledged.
Uncontrolled Keywords: crop pest, south asia, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, rice blast, yellow stemborer, bacterial leaf blight, brown rust, loose smut, brown planthopper
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2015 12:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/11070

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