Skip navigation

Development and physico-mechanical characterization of carrageenan and poloxamer-based lyophilized matrix as a potential buccal drug delivery system

Development and physico-mechanical characterization of carrageenan and poloxamer-based lyophilized matrix as a potential buccal drug delivery system

Kianfar, Farnoosh, Ayensu, Isaac and Boateng, Joshua S. ORCID: 0000-0002-6310-729X (2014) Development and physico-mechanical characterization of carrageenan and poloxamer-based lyophilized matrix as a potential buccal drug delivery system. Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy, 40 (3). pp. 361-369. ISSN 0363-9045 (Print), 1520-5762 (Online) (doi:10.3109/03639045.2012.762655)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Author's accepted manuscript)
10677_Boateng_Development and physico mechanical (AAM) 2013.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (525kB) | Preview

Abstract

Context and objectives: The buccal mucosa presents a unique surface for non-invasive drug delivery and also avoids first-pass metabolism. The objective of this study was the formulation development of polymeric mucoadhesive lyophilized wafers as a matrix for potential buccal drug delivery.

Materials and methods: Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to develop an optimum freeze-cycle, incorporating an annealing step. The wafers were prepared by lyophilization of gels containing three polymers, κ-carrageenan (CAR 911), poloxamer (P407) and polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600). The formulations were characterized using texture analysis (for mechanical and mucoadhesion properties), hydration studies, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), DSC, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Results and discussion: DSC showed the eutectic temperature (12.8 °C) of the system where the liquid solution and pure solids both existed at a fixed pressure which helped determine the freeze-annealing cycle at 55 °C for 7 h. Mechanical resistance to compression, hydration and mucoadhesion studies showed that optimized wafers were obtained from aqueous gels containing 2% w/w CAR 911, 4% w/w P407 and 4.4% w/w PEG 600. TGA showed residual water of approximately 1% and SEM showed a porous polymeric network that made ease of hydration possible.

Conclusions: Lyophilized wafers by freeze-drying gels containing 2% w/w CAR 911, 4% w/w P407 and 4.4% w/w PEG 600 with optimum physico-mechanical properties has been achieved.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy on 19/04/2013, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.3109/03639045.2012.762655
Uncontrolled Keywords: adhesion, carrageenan, glass transition, swelling capacity, wafer
Subjects: R Medicine > RS Pharmacy and materia medica
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Pharmaceutical, Chemical & Environmental Sciences
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2016 09:12
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/10677

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics