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Selective attentional bias, conscious awareness and the fear of pain

Selective attentional bias, conscious awareness and the fear of pain

Keogh, Edmund, Thompson, Trevor ORCID: 0000-0001-9880-782X and Hannent, Ian (2003) Selective attentional bias, conscious awareness and the fear of pain. Pain, 104 (1-2). pp. 85-91. ISSN 0304-3959 (Print), 1872-6623 (Online) (doi:10.1016/S0304-3959(02)00468-2)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

It has been suggested that healthy individuals with a high fear of pain possess a selective attentional bias in favour of pain-related material. However, evidence is limited since only a few studies have been conducted to date. In addition, these studies have not yet examined whether such attentional biases are relatively automatic, and so are outside conscious control. We, therefore, conducted a study with unmasked (conscious) and masked (preconscious) versions of the visual dot-probe task, and examined the effect of pain fearfulness on performance. In the masked trials, we confirmed that individuals with a low fear of pain seem to orient away from pain-related material. Furthermore, we also found that when stimuli were masked, this bias was reversed. Neither effect was found amongst participants high in the fear of pain. Together, these findings suggest that the ability to orient away from pain-related stimuli may be under conscious control in low fearful people, whereas such a mechanism does not seem to exist in those high in the fear of pain.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: fear, selective attention, cognitive bias, pain, awareness
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Health & Social Care
School of Health & Social Care > Department of Psychology & Counselling
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/10633

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